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The ELOSH Project

A Short Introduction

Key facts about the European Core Learning Outcomes for Integration of Support and Housing (ELOSH).

  1. ELOSH will contribute to fight against housing exclusion of groups with support needs by improving cooperation between social services workers and housing staff.
     
  2. ELOSH aims at transferring innovative learning outcomes and specific training material on housing and integrated support to tailored made training at local level in 7 EU member states.
     
  3. ELOSH approach is to co-produce those training modules with citizens to make them identify what services they need.
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The European Core Learning Outcomes for Integration of Support and Housing (ELOSH) will transfer innovative learning results and training materials on integrated support and housing, developed by Sitra expert consultancy on training in the field of housing with health, care and support.

This material will promote the co-production of services including citizen’s needs as its core.

Partners will blend and adapt these outcomes and tools to create a flexible European pack to be tested in seven countries by housing and support providers, working also with VET providers and service users.

Finally, results and training packs will be exploited, disseminated and available on this online platform.


Why is ELOSH important?

In 2010, 3 of 4 people in the EU thought home­lessness had increased in their country over the past 3 years. The facts are:

  • At least 1,2 million people with disabilities live in institutional care in the European Union, primarily due to the lack of community-based services, including housing.
     
  • Homeless population in Greece also rose by 25% between 2009 and 2011.
     
  • In UK on 31 March 2012, the number of household in temporary accommodation was 5% higher than the same date last year.
     
  • For several years now the number of places in specialised insitutions in Slovenia has been in­creasing by approximately 1,000 a year.
     
  • In 2013, 2,303 persons were living in an insti­tution, emergency accommodation or shelter in Ireland.